Patients raise £25k for prostate cancer biopsy machine

Prostate Cancer Support Organisation (PCaSO) donates �25,000 to Western Sussex Hospitals Trust to help buy a biopsy machine. (Left to right) John Harmer from Upper Marden, PCaSO fundraiser; Paul Carter, Head of Surgery; Barnaby Chappell, Consultant Urological Surgeon; David Hurst from Pulborough, PCaSO Secretary and Ian Graham-Jones from Westbourne, PCaSO trustee.
Prostate Cancer Support Organisation (PCaSO) donates �25,000 to Western Sussex Hospitals Trust to help buy a biopsy machine. (Left to right) John Harmer from Upper Marden, PCaSO fundraiser; Paul Carter, Head of Surgery; Barnaby Chappell, Consultant Urological Surgeon; David Hurst from Pulborough, PCaSO Secretary and Ian Graham-Jones from Westbourne, PCaSO trustee.

Prostate cancer patients have donated £25,000 to Western Sussex Hospitals Trust to help buy a biopsy machine that makes diagnosis easier.

Patients at St Richard’s, Worthing and Southlands Hospitals had to travel out of West Sussex to get this treatment. But the new £85,000 machine at St Richard’s Hospital, Chichester, will allow men to be treated locally.

The money was raised by local members of the Prostate Cancer Support Organisation, the largest patient-run support organisation for prostate cancer in the country.

Roger Bacon from Rustington is chairman of the organisation. He said: “The new equipment is a huge step forward in making diagnosis easier and more accurate. Prostate cancer patients along the south coast have worked to raise money and we are pleased to help supply the state of the art systems to our local hospitals.”

Almost every prostate cancer patient has to have samples taken of their cancer tumour so that doctors can see how aggressive the cancer is, and the biopsy is part of the diagnosis.

The new equipment draws together ultrasound and MRI scan information, presenting it on a screen, which enables the surgeon to accurately pinpoint the tumour to get the required samples. Potentially infectious areas are avoided and because the patient is asleep he is more comfortable.

Figures suggest that 40,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in UK and around 10,000 die of it. The earlier it is diagnosed the more likely it will be treated effectively.

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