Magazine: Hospital one of the scariest places for people with Parkinson’s to be – report

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A new report released by Parkinson’s UK paints a deeply disturbing picture of life in hospital for those with the degenerative condition. Watch the following video to find out about the report and to hear one woman’s story

From being forced to smuggle in medication to being subjected to shocking levels of drug deprivation by hospital staff, data commissioned to time with the launch of Parkinson’s Awareness Week paints a deeply disturbing picture of life in hospital for those with the degenerative condition.

Parkinson's UK report

Parkinson's UK report

The report finds that almost half (46 per cent) of people with Parkinson’s were denied regular access to the medication they need to keep their Parkinson’s under control– often leading to catastrophic consequences.

Medication is a lifeline for people with Parkinson’s, with many people taking around 15 tablets a day as part of a strict regime just to be able to move or communicate with those around them. Without it, over half of people with Parkinson’s felt there was a significant impact on their health. Yet in hospital – one of the places where people with Parkinson’s should feel safest – almost six in ten (59 per cent) who did not have regular access to medication in hospital felt there was a significant impact on their health.

Far from being isolated incidents, seven out of ten of people with Parkinson’s reported experiencing increased levels of anxiety whilst in hospital because of the difficulties around getting their medication.

Watch the following video to hear more about the report and to hear from Patricia McWilliam-Fowler, 68, who cared for her husband Ian, 74, before he died unexpectedly and suddenly in February last year.