Rustington care home for disabled people gets 'outstanding' inspection rating

St Bridgets care home in Ilex Close, Rustington, was rated as outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Picture: Derek Martin
St Bridgets care home in Ilex Close, Rustington, was rated as outstanding by the Care Quality Commission. Picture: Derek Martin

A care home which looks after disabled people in Rustington is celebrating being rated among the top three per cent in the country.

Following an inspection in April, St Bridget’s care home in Ilex Close, Rustington, was rated as outstanding by the Care Quality Commission in a report published this month.

Will Dye, 35, recently moved to St Bridget’s. He said: “The home enables me to do things more independently with other people around and it makes me happy to be here.

“I like living here because I can do my own things around the home.”

The management of the care home was also praised. Manager Marcus Richards said: “The recent inspection at St Bridget’s demonstrates the passion, hard work and commitment of the entire staff team. Every person working at St. Bridget’s contributed toward this fantastic achievement and I am proud to work with them all.”

The care home was opened in 1955 by war hero and global humanitarian Leonard Cheshire. It changed buildings in the 1980s and today houses 37 residents and employs 80 staff, including Simon Gawn.

He said: “I came in on Christmas morning last year especially to support one person to Skype his sister in New Zealand. He and his sister really appreciated it.”

The inspection said boxing, gardening, shopping or going to the beach were just some of the activities on offer and that residents were supported by technology. An avid reader learned how to use the Kindle app thanks to a computer assistant and a neck appliance was made so the person could turn the pages with a head movement.

End of life care was praised and staff understood the importance of grieving, the report said. At Christmas, fairy lights displayed names of those who had passed away or their loved ones, helping residents to feel they were still part of their celebrations.

Deborah Ivanova, deputy chief inspector of adult social care, said: “People received exceptional care personalised to their needs.”