Bishop sleeps rough to support homeless

The Bishop of Chichester, Dr Martin Warner, will be sleeping rough for one night to raise money for Turning Tides, a charity that helps the homeless.

Wednesday, 30th January 2019, 2:41 pm
Updated Thursday, 7th February 2019, 9:57 pm

Bishop Martin has agreed to take part in the annual Sleep Out to help highlight the hardship and danger of sleeping rough.

He said: “It is all too easy to end up homeless with no other option than sleeping rough.

“By choosing to take part in this Sleep Out challenge I want to support Turning Tides in raising funds to tackle homelessness on our own doorstep.”

The Bishop of Chichester, Dr Martin Warner, will be sleeping out to raise money for Turning Tides
The Bishop of Chichester, Dr Martin Warner, will be sleeping out to raise money for Turning Tides

Turning Tides has two Sleep Out events, at Broadwater CE Primary School in Worthing on Saturday, February 2, and at River Beach Primary School in Littlehampton on Saturday, February 23.

Both start at 6pm, when supporters start arriving with their sleeping bags and cardboard for shelter.

An evening meal and hot drink will be served and there will be a talk before people go to find a place to make their bed. In the morning, breakfast and a hot drink will be served while people share their experiences from the night.

Tickets are £12 and minimum sponsorship is £100. The minimum age is 14 and under-16s must be accompanied by an adult. Visit www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sleepout-2019-turning-tides-tickets-52223027481 to book.

Bishop Martin, who will join the Littlehampton Sleep Out, said: “This is not about statistics, it is about the plight of human beings and the complicated situations some of us have to face.

“The Turning Tides Sleep Out is an opportunity to draw attention to the needs of the homeless in Littlehampton and across the whole of Sussex.”

Homelessness can happen to anyone from all walks of life. Turning Tides, which has seen a rise in the use of its services, helped 1,700 in the past year and helps, on average, 65 people a day in its community hubs.