Worthing residents ‘seething’ at plans to build 55ft 5G mast on their doorsteps

Residents and politicians in West Worthing have joined forces to combat the construction of a 55ft-high phone mast on their doorsteps.

Tuesday, 8th June 2021, 5:03 pm

Consultation has started on the erection of a telecommunications mast near the Arundel Road Esso petrol station – an area surrounded by houses and bungalows.

Helen Brooker, 63, lives in neighbouring Whylands Avenue. One of her neighbours, an elderly lady in a bungalow, could have the mast built just feet away from her house.

“It will be a blot on the landscape,” Helen said.

Residents around Arundel Road are furious at the plans.

“The view from some of the houses will be horrendous, completely spoiling the view of the South Downs.

“It’s just not in-keeping with the area. The proximity to the houses is ridiculous – utterly ridiculous.”

She said the mast would have dire consequences for house prices in the area. One neighbour had moved in 12 months ago, she said, and had calculated he would immediately lose around £100,000 from his house value.

“It’s a lovely, lovely area and this is such a shame,” she added. “We’re absolutely seething.”

Some residents were also concerned about the health implications of 5G technology, Helen said, although there is no evidence 5G technology has any adverse health effects.

Consultation leaflets were only distributed to 12 surrounding properties, which meant Helen and others had to copy them themselves to inform their neighbours.

Worthing West MP Sir Peter Bottomley said the proposal was ‘unacceptable’ and he would be telling the developer to find an alternative.

“This is a garage area surrounded to the east, west and south by low-lying bungalows,” he said.

“It’s the wrong place to agree to place a transmission mast. It ruins the local amenity. I will tell the proposers that they need to find an acceptable alternative.

“If you stand looking north from the petrol station forecourt, in the distance you can ee another mast, up in the High Salvington area. Alternatively, is to seek agreement either from a local church or an existing structure where the equipment will not ruin the views or the lives of local people.

“I am grateful to the local residents who met me, socially distanced, to see the problem. I agree that there local amenity is at risk.”