Dominic Raab, foreign secretary, visits Lancing to support Conservative candidate Tim Loughton

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab with Conservative candidate for East Worthing and Shoreham, Tim Loughton SUS-191126-131936001
Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab with Conservative candidate for East Worthing and Shoreham, Tim Loughton SUS-191126-131936001

The Conservative party has brought out the big guns as one of the Government’s leaders lent his support to a local parliamentary candidate.

Foreign secretary Dominic Raab visited the Perch on Lancing Beach today (November 26) to assist long-standing East Worthing and Shoreham MP Tim Loughton.

Mr Raab, who also acts as the first secretary of state, said the Tory government’s commitment to enforcing Brexit would provide a boost to Worthing and Adur.

“Coastal communities, villages and towns will have felt left behind, but we have got a real opportunity to boost fishing with new policies and cutting business rates,” he said.

Leaving the EU would see the UK leave the union’s Common Fishing Policy (CFP), making the Government responsible for managing fishing off our shores.

In the event of Brexit, the CFP would stay in place until the end of the transition period in December 2020.

Mr Raab, who was in charge of the UK’s Brexit negotiations from July 2018 until his resignation four months later, added the Tory commitment to cutting business rates – up to 50 per cent for small businesses by 2021 – would help to ‘revive’ the high street and investment in schools and policing would follow.

Austerity measures implemented by the Tory government have seen funding to public services, education and policing decimated over the past decade.

With the temporarily dormant Rampion wind farm on the horizon, Mr Raab pointed to the UK as a ‘global leader’ in green initiatives and claimed the UK was lowering carbon emissions at the highest rate of any G20 member.

He said Tory initiatives, including potentially trebling the size of the wind farm, were an attempt to ‘decarbonise the economy’ and would help the party appeal to younger voters who wanted jobs of the future.